Restoration Hesperia | Concrete Hesperia | Patio Remodeling

Concrete Pouring in Cold Weather
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First, let’s define cold weather with respect to concrete. Any time you have 3 consecutive days where the average daily temperature is less than 40°F or if the temperature is lower than 50°F for less than half of any of the 3 days, concrete thinks it’s cold. Pouring concrete in cold weather can have a detrimental affect on concrete curing for several reasons.

Concrete transforms from a liquid to a solid material through a chemical reaction. The speed of the reaction depends upon the temperature of the concrete. When the weather is warm, the reaction proceeds quickly. When it’s cold and the ground hasn’t been thawed, the reaction slows down. That’s the problem: the concrete needs to harden as rapidly as possible to resist pressures caused by water freezing within the concrete.

If the temperature is too cold, the concrete may not have reached a minimum strength of 500 psi soon enough to resist the effects of freezing temperatures. If your concrete isn’t protected with concrete curing blankets after it’s poured, it may cool too rapidly, slowing the chemical reaction.

Poor finishing techniques can also doom your slabs. Freshly poured concrete often bleeds. The water in the mix floats to the top, since it’s the lightest ingredient. Floating or troweling this water into the concrete weakens the top layer. Troweling the concrete too early can seal this bleed water just below the surface as well. If your slab is then exposed to freezing temperatures several days later, this water can freeze and fracture the top layer. Using a concrete curing blanket can eliminate the potential of freezing.

Concrete can be successfully poured in cold weather but several precautions need to be taken:

Never pour concrete on frozen ground, snow, or ice. Use Powerblanket® concrete curing blankets for ground thawing ahead of time.

Be sure to order air-entrained concrete. Request a heated mix or order 100 lbs of extra cement for each cubic yard of concrete. This extra cement helps develop early strength.

Be sure the concrete is ordered with a low slump (drier mix). This minimizes bleed water.

After the final finish is completed, cover the concrete with a Powerblanket® concrete curing blanket. The heated concrete blankets will prevent freezing and keep the concrete at optimal curing temperature.

After about 3 days, remove Powerblanket® concrete blankets to allow the concrete to air dry.

Outdoor Living | Patio Cover Design | Construction Hesperia

Why Invest in a Custom Patio Cover

DSC_9422Patio covers are becoming increasingly popular across America and it’s easy to see why. Adding a patio cover to a deck or patio makes any outdoor area usable throughout the year.

Additionally, whether you’re installing an aluminum patio cover or a pergola with a retractable awning, adding a patio cover will add beauty to your home. For many homeowners, however, the high investment value is one of the most important benefits of adding a patio cover. The following are several reasons why adding a patio cover makes good financial sense.

Significant Energy Savings

The more of your yard that’s shaded, the cooler the interior of your home will be. This rule of thumb simplifies some very complex thermodynamics. Basically, without a patio cover, nothing will block the hot sun from soaking into the soil around your home. Toward the end of the day, this heat will be released back into the air, making your property feel like an oven. Recent research has revealed that planting fast-growing trees can cut a home’s energy costs by as much as 30%. Patio covers act much like trees; they create shade and offer protection from the scorching sun. Adding a patio cover can help reduce your energy costs.

Aluminum Patio Cover:
more affordable than an addition

Most homeowners are looking for ways to maximize space. However, in today’s turbulent economic climate, few people can afford the construction costs associated with adding an entirely new room – unless you’re talking about creating an outdoor room, that is. patio-design-high-desert-s&s-constructionThe most accessible form of patio cover, a pergola, can cost as little as $500, assuming you choose to install it yourself. (Plant grapes or hops to grow over the pergola, and you’ll have a shady retreat in the summer.) Even if you choose a more expensive option, such as a solid patio cover, you’ll see far lower costs than you would a traditional room addition.

Solid Style Patio Cover:
increased home value

In these days of low home prices, many property owners are looking for ways to increase value. Especially when accompanied by beautiful landscaping, a patio cover can create the kind of protected oasis that prospective buyers find highly appealing. This means you’ll probably see an excellent return on investment for your patio cover project, since you’ll be able to ask a higher selling price for your home.

As you can see, patio covers are more than just a great way to make any home more livable; they are also an excellent home improvement investment.